tsainola

a vegetarian pop-up for New Orleans

Tag: garlic

Recipe: Beets with Lemon and Parsley

At the April OCH Art Market, we served pureed beets on a plate with jasmine rice, fresh greens from the Crescent City Farmer’s Market, and purple carrots and baby radishes.  The beet puree was based largely on this delightful beet salad recipe that we came across way back in 2004 in the The New York Times and have been cooking ever since. We wanted to make use of the fantastic color and flavor of the beets, but to contrast them with the greens and to the other root vegetables that we wanted to serve intact. Pureeing the beets allowed us to keep everything else really simple. Greens could just be greens. Carrots carrots. Radishes radishes. Rice rice. This recipe doesn’t take long to make, and you’ll end up with something that will keep for a week in the refrigerator, and is good with bread, as a garnish for a soup, with eggs and cheese, or pretty much as a fine addition to pretty much any meal we can think of. 

Ingredients: beets, lemons, parsley, garlic, oil, salt and pepper

1. Cook beets by boiling them in water. If you’re in a hurry, a quicker way to handle the beets is to peel and cut the beets before you cook them, so that they take 10 minutes to cook rather than the 45 stated in the NY Times recipe.

2. With a blender or food processor, puree the beets with lemon juice and oil, adjusting quantities to achieve desired consistency and acidity. We served a puree that was thick and a little rough like creole mustard, something that held its shape when spooned onto a bowl of rice, but could also be mixed into that rice without too much trouble. (see picture from preceding post)

3.  Add cloves of garlic, a couple handfuls of parsley, salt, and pepper, and pulse. We add a clove or two of garlic for each beet we blend — a lot —  so that the raw garlic provides a bit of unexpected bite to the beet puree.

 

Recipes: Rice, Greens, and Pickled Daikon

We had the pleasure of teaching a cooking class at the Grow Dat Youth Farm out in City Park last weekend. These were the recipes we shared, based on produce that’s available from Grow Dat and other vendors at the Crescent City Farmer’s Market this month. These are simple dishes, but using good ingredients and a hearty stock made from vegetable peels and trimmings make for a delicious meal with a full complement of flavors and textures. 

Rice with Black-eyed Peas, Carrots, and Greens

Ingredients: brown rice, black-eyed peas, onions, carrots, greens (kale, collards, carrot tops, etc.), oil, vegetable stock

  1. Heat oil in deep saucepan or pot.
  2. Cook diced onions on medium heat until they become translucent.
  3. Add diced carrots and cook until onions begin to brown.
  4. Add rice and black-eyed peas. Stir to coat grains of rice with oil.
  5. Add stock (or water) so that the depth of the water over the rice is approximately equal to the depth of the rice and the other ingredients below.
  6. Stir in chopped greens, cover, bring to a boil, lower heat, cover, and cook at a low boil for 30-40 minutes, or until the rice and peas are fully cooked.

Chard with Mushrooms and Garlic

Ingredients: chard, mushrooms, garlic, hot peppers, sweet peppers, feta

  1. Heat oil in a frying pan until it shimmers and a drop of water sizzles on contact.
  2. Add sliced mushrooms and cook on high heat so they begin to brown within a minute or two. Stir occasionally.
  3. Add chopped chard stems, diced sweet peppers, and minced hot peppers, and cook for one minute, still on high heat.
  4. Add chopped chard leaves and chopped garlic, and cook for two minutes.
  5. Add salt and freshly ground pepper to taste and serve immediately, with feta sprinkled on top if available.

Daikon with Lemon and Cilantro

Ingredients: daikon, lemons, cilantro, salt, sugar

  1. Cut daikon into thin strips, thin slices, or grate, and place in a bowl with a sprinkling of salt and a little sugar.
  2. Knead for a few minutes, until the daikon softens. Drain the liquid that collects at the bottom of the bowl and rinse with water.
  3. Place drained daikon in a bowl with a few squeezes of lemon juice, salt, and enough water to cover.
  4. Allow daikon to soak in the brine while cooking other components of your meal.
  5. Before serving, remove daikon from brine, toss with coarsely chopped cilantro, and serve alongside vegetables and rice.

Menu for Saturday

Olive Boules

Broccoli Black Bean Galette with Toasted Mustard Seeds and Red Pepper

Spicy Mushroom Soup with Scallions and Curried Squash

Cauliflower Soup with Garlic

Fresh Greens with Parsley-fried Black-eyed Peas and Cheese

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Strawberry Orange Clafoutis

Peppermint Fudge/Snickerdoodle/Gingerbread Cookies (2/3 Gluten-free)

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Coffee

Mint Tea

Spiced Lemonade

Menu for Saturday

Spicy Onion Soup with Turnips, Greens, and Blue Cheese

Rosemary Sourdough/Roasted Garlic Bread

Warm Baby Lima Beans with Mizuna and Citrus Olive Sauce

Spicy Mashed Sweet Potatoes with Green Peppers

Roasted Broccoli with Garlic

Boston Bib Nest with Herbed Butternut Squash and Mexican Tarragon

Parsley Beet Rice with Cumin

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Chocolate Truffles

Apple Cider Caramels

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Rosemary Lemonade

Spiced Wine

Hot Toddy

Recipe: Beans, Peas, Zucchini, and a Roasted Red Pepper Broth

We’ve been happy to see the splendid variety of beans and peas at the farmer’s markets these last few weeks. Pink-eyed peas, crowders, butterbeans, limas…none of them take very long to cook, and they’re delicious boiled, fried, cold, leftover, in a stew, or in pretty much any culinary context we can think of. This recipe joins legumes with the rich flavors of roasted red peppers using an unorthodox technique that’s straightforward and yields wonderful results. As you can maybe tell from the title of this post, we developed this recipe so recently that we’re still working on figuring out a decent name for this dish, which we served a couple weeks ago at the OCH Art Market with a fried egg on top, feta, cilantro, and a scoop of rice.

Ingredients: red peppers, jalapeno peppers, celery, onions, garlic, tomato sauce (optional); assorted beans and peas, chopped zucchini and yellow squash

1. On a stove top, grill, or in an oven, roast whole red peppers and jalapeno peppers until the skins blacken, turning the peppers periodically for even roasting. Remove the peppers from heat, and place in a covered container for the peppers to cool and to allow the steam from the roasted peppers to loosen the skins. The jalapenos should take less time to roast, so make sure to keep an eye on them and remove them from heat when they’re roasted.  

2. Once the peppers are cool, peel the peppers, and discard the skins, stems, and seeds. Collect the juices from the roasting pan and container in which the peppers were allowed to cool.

3. In a blender, combine and puree roasted peppers, pan juices, a handful of chopped onions and celery, whole cloves of garlic, a little bit of tomato sauce, and a drizzle of vegetable oil. (This mixture fragrant and versatile and will keep for a few days. It is delicious with pasta, eggs, or even served cold as a salsa of sorts. Last weekend, we mixed in chopped walnuts and minced scallions, and spooned that onto hard-boiled eggs for breakfast.)

4. Combine peas and squash with enough of the roasted pepper mixture to cover, in a pot or saucepan. Add water to thin the mixture, and bring to a boil. Cook at a slow boil for 10-15 minutes, until the legumes and squash are fully cooked and the contents of the pot have been reduced to the desired thickness. Serve in a bowl with feta and cilantro, and a fried egg on top and rice on the side.

 

Menu for Sunday

Cucumber Chickpea Salad

Pickled Bitter Melon with Seared Onions and Feta

Roasted Baby Okra with Goat Yogurt and Peach Chutney

Green Eggplant with Tomatoes, Cardamom and Ginger

Red Lentils with Mushrooms and Garlic

Bright Rice

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Almond Cookie Sandwiches

Black Rice Pudding

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Basil Coconut Limeade

Cucumber Jolly Rancher

Blueberry Sangria

OCH Art Market Menu

We’ll be at the OCH Art Market this Saturday, 8/11, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Our menu looks something like this:

Cabbage and Onion Sesame Buns

Sweet Pear Sesame Buns

Sesame Soy Milk with Salted Radish and Scallions Served with Sweet Corn and Cumin Beignets

Jade Gourd and Tomato Lemongrass Sauce with Rice and and Pickled Hakurei Turnips and Cucumbers

Bitter Melon, Shiitake Mushroom, and Thai Basil Omelette with Rice and Pickled Hakurei Turnips and Cucumbers

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Soy Custard with Ginger Syrup

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Coconut Limeade

Mint Iced Tea

 

Menu for Sunday

Chilled Corn Chowder with Serrano Chili Aioli

Chilled Zucchini Kale Soup with Toasted Walnuts and Tomato Basil Relish

Eggplant with Habaneros, Mushrooms, and Arugula Fried Rice

Roasted Creole Tomato Salad with Fresh Lima Beans and Purple Hull Peas

Breadsticks: Parmesan, Garlic, Sesame

Rosemary Basil Focaccia

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Almond Tofu with Fresh Peaches

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Watermelon Limeade  :  Herbal Iced Tea

Watermelon Cocktail with Lime, Vodka, and Lavender

Sangria

WGNO Appearance

Recognize those plates?

We were out in Jefferson Parish early this morning to help promote the Eat Local Challenge and also to share our cooking with the hosts of WGNO’s Good Morning New Orleans. Check out our four minute segment here. More pictures are available on our Facebook page. We had a couple of dishes on display, including creole cream cheese stuffed squash, fresh whole wheat sourdough bread, and a peach and blueberry tart. We also prepared a courgette and peach salad with corn dressing and a fried okra/courgette and mushroom dish served with herbed lemon yogurt and jasmine rice. Both recipes are available on the WGNO website here.

Recipe: Arugula and Creole Cream Cheese Stuffed Squash

This dish sold out quickly at our last TSAI House event. We used baby squash, and served a few on a plate as hearty one or two bite appetizers. The dish is not so rich, even with the cream cheese, that you couldn’t scale up to using full-grown squash instead for a tasty main course. Give it a try — the recipe takes surprisingly little time to prepare and provides a nice use of the abundant squash at our summer markets.

Ingredients: baby zucchini, baby yellow squash, or baby pattypan squash, potatoes, arugula, garlic, mustard, creole cream cheese, white wine vinegar, parsley, scallions, salt, pepper, vegetable oil

1. Cut baby squash in half, lengthwise. Use a small spoon or a sharp paring knife to scoop out some of the meat of the squash. You want to create a sizable depression within which to place the stuffing. Be very careful if using a paring knife — we like to insert the knife into the squash and rotate the squash about the blade.

2. Cook a potato chopped into small pieces (skin on) in salted water until tender. Before taking the potatoes out of the boiling water, add a handful of arugula. Remove and finely chop the wilted arugula.

3. Mash the potato, mince a few cloves of garlic along with scallions and parsley, and combine these ingredients with the chopped arugula, a few spoonfuls of whole-grain mustard, creole cream cheese, a splash of vinegar, and salt and pepper. Feel free to add chopped hot peppers as well, though the mustard will already provide a little spice.

4. Brush squash halves with oil and spoon the mixture into their depressions. Roast the squash for 10-15 minutes, or until the squash is tender. Garnish with finely chopped scallions, and serve warm.