tsainola

a vegetarian pop-up for New Orleans

Tag: potatoes

Menu for Saturday

Spicy Onion Soup with Turnips, Greens, and Blue Cheese

Rosemary Sourdough/Roasted Garlic Bread

Warm Baby Lima Beans with Mizuna and Citrus Olive Sauce

Spicy Mashed Sweet Potatoes with Green Peppers

Roasted Broccoli with Garlic

Boston Bib Nest with Herbed Butternut Squash and Mexican Tarragon

Parsley Beet Rice with Cumin

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Chocolate Truffles

Apple Cider Caramels

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Rosemary Lemonade

Spiced Wine

Hot Toddy

Menu for Saturday

Beautiful weekend coming up — join us at the OCH Art Market between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on Saturday for a full slate of events, including the 2nd Annual Faubourg Lafayette Historic Home Tour, and musical performances by Kermit Ruffins and Irvin Mayfield on OC Haley Boulevard. The menu: 

Seared Mushroom and Ruby Streak Salad with an Egg

Turnip Soup with Greens and Rosemary

Lentil Burgers on Whole Grain Bread with Satsuma Chutney

Oatmeal Cookies with Yogurt Cheese Frosting

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Coffee, Cappuccino, Latte

Mint Iced Tea

Thyme Lemonade

Menu for Sunday

Rosemary Dumplings with Black Lentils, Caramelized Onions, and Fig

Baby Squash Salad with Cherry Tomatoes , Egg, and Rosemary Basil Pesto

Crunchy Green Beans and Chickpeas with Creamy Poblano Dressing

Chilled Sweet Potato Rounds with Aji Dulce Peppers and Cilantro Coconut Dressing

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Succotash with Hungarian Wax Pepper Relish

Braised Summer Vegetables

Choice of Red-Roasted Potatoes or Mushroom Shiso Fried Rice

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Chicory Tea Cookie and Honey Lemon Goat’s Milk Ice Cream Sandwiches

Watermelon Lime Pudding with Pickled Watermelon Rind

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Cucumber Basil Lemonade

Watermelon 75

Bourbon-soaked Peach Old Fashioned

Recipe: Zucchini Kale Soup with Toasted Walnuts and Tomato Relish

We served this soup cold at our last house event, with a hunk of foccacia on the side. If you have vegetable stock prepared ahead of time, this soup doesn’t take much time to make, and is a beautiful addition to a mid-summer meal. If you’d like something a little richer, we’ve also served this soup with feta and chopped basil sprinkled on top, in place of the tomato relish, and that works well too.

Ingredients: zucchini, potatoes, kale, celery, onions, vegetable stock, walnuts, tomatoes, hot peppers, basil, garlic, cane vinegar

1. Cut zucchini and potatoes (2:1 ratio) and a handful of celery and onions into big chunks. Remove the stems from a few leaves of kale, and chop into large pieces. If you’re looking to use giant zucchini that you want to get rid of, make sure to peel off the tough skin and to scoop out the seeds. In a large pot, cover the vegetables with vegetable stock. Bring to a boil, and cook at a rapid boil until the vegetables are tender. Set aside to cool.

2. Once the vegetables and broth are cool enough to handle, puree the mixture with a blender or food processor, add salt and pepper to taste, and adjust the consistency of the soup with vegetable stock if it needs thinning. Refrigerate.

3. Mince tomatoes and basil and a clove or two of garlic and hot pepper. Combine these ingredients with cane vinegar, salt, and pepper to reach a  consistency similar to a thin salsa.

4. Use a frying pan to toast walnuts in a single layer on the stove — be careful not to burn the walnuts. Remove the walnuts from heat. When cool enough to touch, break the walnuts into small pieces.

5. To serve, ladle the chilled soup into bowls. Spoon tomato relish on top, and sprinkle with walnut pieces.

Zucchini Kale Soup, Focaccia, and Roasted Tomato and Lima Bean Salad

 

Recipe: Cauliflower Soup with Goat Yogurt and Baby Squash

Try this cold soup on a hot summer day. The mild flavor and texture of pureed cauliflower and potatoes serves as a base for slightly acidic goat yogurt and tender baby squash marinated in a little lemon juice, herbs, and ginger. It’s worth it to get to to the farmer’s market early — the beautiful baby squash you can find there are delicate and sweet, and tend to sell out within the first hour or two of the market opening.

Ingredients: cauliflower, potatoes, onions, baby squash, vegetable stock or water, cumin, coriander, turmeric, fennel seed, cilantro, mint, ginger, lemon juice

1. Separate cauliflower into large florets, and place in a pot with quartered potatoes, chopped onions, cumin, coriander, turmeric, fennel seed, and enough water or vegetable stock to cover. Bring to a boil and cook for 20-25 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender. Let cool.

2. In a smaller pot, bring salted water to a rolling boil. Cook the baby squash for two to three minutes, so that they are barely cooked and the squash retain their bright greens and yellows. Transfer the squash to a bowl of ice water, then drain.

3. Finely mince ginger, cilantro, and mint. Combine with lemon juice and water, at a ratio of 1:2. Marinate the squash in this mixture. We find that the lemon juice without the water can be overpowering because baby squash is so delicate in flavor.

4. Puree the cauliflower and potatoes with the cooking liquid, add salt to taste, and chill. The cooling process will thicken the soup somewhat and also change your perception of how salty the soup is, so keep some stock on hand with which to adjust the texture of the soup.

5. Before serving, add freshly-ground pepper and taste the soup again before serving to see if you want to add any more salt.

5. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls. Spoon goat yogurt into the bowl, and place a baby squash or two on top, making sure to include a little of the lemon juice and minced herbs as garnish. The consistency of the soup should be thick enough to float the baby squash.

Recipe: Egg, New Potatoes and Creole Cream Cheese with Blueberry Caviar

Eggs, New Potatoes, and Blueberry Caviar with Creole Cream Cheese and Scallions

We served this at the last OCH Art Market, and it was a big hit as a surprising arrangement of all local ingredients that was both colorful and delicious.

Ingredients: egg, new potatoes, Creole cream cheese, blueberries, pecan oil, scallions, rosemary, salt and pepper

1. To make the blueberry caviar, mix fresh blueberries with finely chopped fresh rosemary and a pinch of salt. Blend to create a consistent texture. The rosemary flavor should be strong but should not overpower the blueberry. If you have any left over, you can use it for salad dressings and marinades.

2. Place potatoes in a small pot with water to cover. Boil for about ten minutes, or until the potatoes are cooked. Be careful not to overcook because you do not want the potatoes to fall apart when you cut them.

3. Slice the potatoes into 1/4 inch thick coins, and lay flat on a plate.

4. Beat eggs, and fry a little bit at a time to create thin silver-dollar sized pieces of egg, thin and on medium high heat so that the eggs cook through in a few seconds. Cut to fit nicely over the potato slices.

5. Spoon a teaspoon of cream cheese, or substitute something mild and creamy like coconut milk, onto the egg and potato assembly, and top off with a spoonful of blueberry caviar.

6. Finish with a drizzle of pecan oil, a sprinkling of thinly sliced scallions, and salt and pepper to taste.

Menu for OCH Art Market, 6/9, Saturday

We’ll be at the OCH Art Market this Saturday from 10-3. This being the headquarters of the Eat Local Challenge, we’ll be serving up dishes with ingredients sourced solely within a 200 mile radius of New Orleans. Tell all the Challenge participants you know! Here’s our tentative menu for Saturday:

Baby Squash, Cherry Tomato, and Feta Salad with Mint and Parsley

Potato and Egg with Blueberry Rosemary Dressing

Garlic Fried Okra and Cremini Mushrooms with Marconi Pepper Relish over Tomato Congee

Braised Potatoes and Shiitake Mushrooms with Goat Cheese over Jasmine Rice

Blueberry Pancakes with Fruit-infused Cane Syrup

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Blueberry Lemonade

Mint Tea

Recipe: Root Vegetable Hash

image courtesy of Nora McGunnigle

 A week of experimentation with the gorgeous root vegetables that are currently available at the Crescent City Farmer’s Market yielded this recipe for vegetable hash, which we served with baked eggs and sourdough bread at our brunch last weekend. There’s a couple of steps to this recipe, but they’re simple and the results are well worth the effort. The first step is to make some mustard, which is easier than you might imagine, followed by the roasting of mustard-coated vegetables, and then the pan-frying of the vegetables with a tomato-mushroom-split pea sauce to create a rich, colorful dish that will fill you up and stick to your ribs. Check in next week for Grandma’s Apple Pie Recipe.

Ingredients: root vegetables (such as turnips, rutabagas, parsnips, pumpkin, potatoes, and carrots), mustard, vegetable oil, onions, wild mushrooms (such as porcini, shiitake, black trumpet, morel), vegetable broth, tomato sauce, split peas, cilantro

1. Dice the root vegetables, and coat with a dressing made by whisking together vegetable oil and mustard. Roast vegetables in a single layer, and stirring once or twice to turn the vegetables. They are ready when the vegetables are cooked and browned on the edges. This should take twenty to thirty minutes.

2. In a saucepan, heat oil and cook diced onions and finely chopped mushrooms on medium heat, until the onions are translucent — eight to twelve minutes. Add vegetable broth, tomato sauce, and a handful of split peas. Cook on medium heat for thirty to forty minutes, until the split peas are cooked but still somewhat firm. (Use the split peas judiciously, as they are strong in flavor and will overpower the sauce if used in abundance.) The consistency of the sauce should resemble that of a marinara sauce — use broth or water to adjust.

3. The roasted vegetables and sauce can be prepared a day in advance. To make the hash, heat oil in a frying pan, add enough roasted vegetables to cover the bottom of the pan. Ladle the tomato mushroom sauce on top of the vegetables, using enough to thoroughly coat the vegetables. Cook on high heat, stirring frequently, for five to six minutes.

4. Salt and pepper hash to taste. Garnish with chopped cilantro, and serve immediately. 

       

Recipe: Root Vegetable Soup with Greens and Pickles

(image: NOLA Locavores)

We love this soup, which uses the most humble of ingredients, and were excited that our guests at the Autumn Harvest Dinner enjoyed this simple and surprising soup as much as we do. We developed this recipe from one we came across in a Boston Globe article a couple years ago, which was itself an adaptation of a John Thorne recipe.

Ingredients: potatoes (skins intact), carrots and carrot tops, turnip greens, butter, chopped scallions, finely chopped garlic, mustard seeds, chopped fresh dill, chopped dill pickles + pickling liquid from the jar, milk, salt and pepper

1. Cover whole potatoes and carrots (chopped into large inch-long sections) with water. Bring to a boil, add torn turnip greens (stems removed) and chopped carrot tops, and cook for 30-35 minutes, or until the potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork.

2. In a soup pot, melt butter over medium heat. Stir in scallions, garlic, and mustard seeds. Cook gently until the garlic is soft and fragrant. Use a large quantity of scallions — the Globe recipe calls for an entire bunch for four servings of soup, along with a clove or two of garlic, and a teaspoon of mustard seeds.

3. Transfer carrots, turnip greens, and carrot tops to the scallion mixture, and remove from heat. Remove potatoes from the other pot. Once the potatoes are cool enough to touch, remove the skins by squeezing the potatoes. Quarter the potatoes and return them to the broth. Sprinkle with dill. With a large spoon, chop and mash the potatoes, but leaving a number of small and medium-sized chunks. The mashed potatoes will thicken the broth.

4. Combine the potato and carrot/scallion mixture. Add the pickles and pickling liquid, using approximately one pickle per person. Bring to a simmer and cook over medium heat for five minutes. Adjust the consistency with pickling liquid, and milk or water. Season with salt and pepper, and garnish with scallions and chopped carrot tops.